slimlilmouse

Move over, Eminem! If you haven’t heard of the new internet sensation, Slim Jesus, he’s the new white hope of the rap industry! (Even we couldn’t keep a straight face with that one.) The Ohio rapper is known for making astronomical waves this summer with his mid-August slapper “Drill Time,” which takes influences of Chicago‘s infamous style of music known as drill.

Following the release of the single, various personalities -— including Puff Daddy, Amber Rose, Meek Mill and Vince Staples -— have taken to social media to commend and criticize the rapper, who hails from Hamilton, Ohio. He’s also been cosigned by Montana of of 300 (we hear there’s a collab on the way), and he was also the special guest at Chief Keef‘s hologram fest. However, not everyone is here for Slim Jesus‘ bars, namely Lil Mouse, who happens to be one of the front-runners of Chicago drill music.

Lil Mouse has released an official diss track for Slim Jesus, cleverly calling it “Kill Time.” Mouse criticizes Slim Jesus‘ lyrical content in the song, although in a recent interview with Vlad TV, Jesus admits that his lyrics are purely fabricated for the sake of making what he perceives to be fun music. “That sh*t’s dope,” he says when asked why he chooses to rap about gun violence.

Check out “Kill Time” below.

HarleyQuinn_NJ

We can definitely understand Lil Mouse‘s frustrations. Drill music, like most sub-genres of hip-hop, is reflective of Chicago’s violent atmosphere in low-income parts of the city. Slim Jesus simply doesn’t live that life, but at least he’s aware of that fact. He’s also gone on to say that he thinks white people who drop the N-word “sound corny,” unlike some OTHER white rappers we know… *cough Post Malone cough*

We can appreciate Slim Jesus, but we don’t have to like him. No one’s asking him to be Eminem, MGK, Mac Miller or any of the like, and he’s not trying to be. Slim Jesus is very self-aware; he gives props where they are due, he watches out for the well-being of his friends, and if the thing everyone clamors for in hip-hop is honesty, well…his music might not fit the bill, but he’s being straight up all the way through outside of the music.

Go, Slim Jesus.